Modern Slavery Act Registry

Organisation
Business & Human Rights Resource Centre (BHRRC)
Location
Type
Sector
The Business & Human Rights Resource Centre is currently maintaining a public track record of companies’ statements under the UK Modern Slavery Act, the California Transparency in Supply Chain Act and the Australian Modern Slavery Act.

This is a transparent, free and open access registry to drive increased transparency, lesson learning and continuous improvements in reporting and responses by companies to tackle modern slavery. This is supported by ETI, Business & Human Rights Resource Centre, Anti-Slavery International, FLEX, KnowTheChain, Humanity United, Freedom Fund and CORE Coalition.

The Business & Human Rights Resource Centre maintains the Modern Slavery Registry to create a public track record of companies’ statements under the UK Modern Slavery Act, the California Transparency in Supply Chains Act and the Australian Modern Slavery Act. In March 2020 the Registry held over 12,000 statements.

FTSE 100 & the UK Modern Slavery Act: From Disclosure to Action. October 2018.

In 2018 the action reported by companies varied greatly, with only a small cluster of leaders standing out. Over half of the FTSE 100 scored below this figure, and 28 companies scored fewer than 20%. This is all the more disappointing as it represents little change from our previous assessments. This year, one clear area of improvement is compliance with the minimum requirements set out by the MSA, (statements must be signed by director, approved by board and available on the company’s homepage). Companies themselves recognise that a level playing field has not been achieved. Consumer-facing companies are subject to greater scrutiny and are expected to demonstrate a strong commitment to fighting modern slavery, while their lesser-known peers can get away with publishing weak statements, or not publishing at all.

In April 2017 Ergon Associates produced a report analysing the content of modern slavery statements. This covers 150 statements from March 2017 and compares them to our previous analysis of modern slavery reports from early adopters a year ago. In October 2018 they compiled a second report: Modern slavery reporting: is there evidence of progress?


Significance for seafood businesses: 

Not seafood-specific but provides a means for seafood businesses to publically disclose policies, standards and management approaches to mitigating forced labour in their supply chains and in accordance with the UN Guiding Principles.


Find out more

To find out more click on the links below. Please note you will be taken to an external website.