Pollack in the Celtic Sea and West of Scotland (ICES subareas VI and VII), Gillnet

Pollachius pollachius
Content last updated
31 May 2018
Stock
Pollack in ICES subarea VI and VII, Celtic Sea and West of Scotland
Management
EU
Stock Status
4 of 5
High risk
Management
2 of 5
Low risk
Bycatch
3 of 5
Moderate risk
Habitat
2 of 5
Low risk

Stock status

4 of 5
High risk

The status of the pollack stock in the Celtic Sea and West of Scotland (Sub-areas Vl and Vll) has been scored a high risk. This is because the species has moderate resilience to fishing exploitation (FishBase, 2015), but the population trend is unknown due to the limited information available for this data-limited stock. Available data are limited and additional information is required to evaluate the status of the stock with a high degree of confidence.

Management

2 of 5
Low risk

The management of pollack in the Celtic Sea and West of Scotland (Sub-areas Vl and Vll) has been scored a low risk. This is because management decisions are informed by an annual stock assessment, catches of pollack have been below the available TAC over the last decade, and a comprehensive regulatory framework has been put in place. Data-limited approaches are used for setting management controls, which are based on knowledge of the fisheries and the biology of the stock. However, the agreed TAC is substantially higher than the recommended catches and does not limit fishing opportunities.

Bycatch

3 of 5
Moderate risk

The bycatch risk of this fishery has been scored a moderate risk. Although discarding of pollack was negligible at 0.5% of total international catch weight in 2014 (ICES, 2015), bycatches of non-target species in the set gillnet fishery can make up a moderate proportion of catch weight. Set gillnets can take bycatches of protected, endangered and threatened (PET) species (e.g. sharks, rays and sea turtles) in certain circumstances. Some mitigation measures have been established to reduce bycatch impacts on PET species.

Habitat

2 of 5
Low risk

The habitat risk of this fishery has been scored a low risk.  This is because set gillnets have relatively little impact on the seabed compared to other fishing activities.  Lost or abandoned gillnets can get entangled on habitat features and weights can cause surface penetration of the seabed.  Gillnets interact with the seabed, but significant interaction with vulnerable marine habitats is unlikely.  Some spatial management is in place to protect vulnerable marine habitats.