Cuttlefish in ICES subdivisions VIId, e (English Channel), Beam trawls

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Content last updated
03 June 2020
Stock
Cuttlefish in ICES subdivisions VIId, e (English Channel)
Management
EU
Stock Status
2 of 5
Low risk
Management
4 of 5
High risk
Bycatch
4 of 5
High risk
Habitat
4 of 5
High risk

Stock status

2 of 5
Low risk

Cuttlefish in the English Channel (ICES Divisions 7d and e) has been scored a low risk.  This is because the stock is exploited at levels close to maximum sustainable yield.

This result has to be treated with caution. There appear to changes in the distribution, spawning behaviour and targeting of the stock by the fishers. Further work is needed to fully elucidate these effects on the stock.  

Management

4 of 5
High risk

The management of cuttlefish in Divisions 7d and 7e has been scored a high risk. This is because there are some management measures in place, but the effectiveness of these measures remains unclear.  Cuttlefish in Divisions 7d and 7e have been assessed usingin 2019 with methods derived from ICES Data limited-Limited Stocks methods during 2019. However, there is no formal advice and the results of the assessment are not subject to a management response. 

Bycatch

4 of 5
High risk

The bycatch risk of this fishery has been scored a high risk. This is because beam trawls have the potential to take relatively high quantities of bycatch of non-target and vulnerable species (> 30% of catch weight), including demersal elasmobranchs and protected, endangered and threatened (e.g. sharks and rays) species in certain circumstances.  Absolute levels of discards across all fleets have gradually decreased since 2002 and the incoming EU landings obligation is intended to reduce discarding further (Catchpole et al., 2011).

Habitat

4 of 5
High risk

The habitat risk of this fishery has been scored a high risk. This is because beam trawls interact with the seabed, modifying bottom topography including damage and removal of some biogenic features and interacting with vulnerable marine habitats and benthic communities.  However, the risk due to damage to vulnerable marine habitats is likely to be reduced given that most of the footprint of the gear occurs on core fishing grounds.   Some spatial management is in place and is continually being developed, which will restrict the footprint of this gear on the seabed. However, there remains some uncertainty about the location of some sensitive seabed habitats so these remain at risk.