Albacore Tuna, South Atlantic; Troll, Pole and Line

Thunnus alalunga
Content last updated
06 August 2019
Stock
South Atlantic
Management
International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas
Stock Status
2 of 5
Low risk
Management
3 of 5
Moderate risk
Bycatch
2 of 5
Low risk
Habitat
1 of 5
Very low risk

Stock status

2 of 5
Low risk

Albacore in the South Atlantic has been scored a low risk. The current biomass is above sustainable levels associated with maximum sustainable yield and fishing mortality levels are below sustainable levels associated with maximum sustainable yield. 

The results indicate, with a high degree of probability, that albacore tuna in the South Atlantic are neither overfished nor undergoing overfishing.

Management

3 of 5
Moderate risk

The management of South Atlantic albacore has been scored a moderate risk. The International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tuna (ICCAT), the relevant Regional Fisheries Management Organisation, has adopted a scientifically based total allowable catch (TAC). Catches have remained below the TAC but not all countries comply with the regulations. We have awarded a moderate concern score because there remains uncertainty around their status and the effects of different catch limits on their ability to rebuild the stock. 

Bycatch

2 of 5
Low risk

The bycatch in the albacore tuna south Atlantic Ocean pole and line fisheries has been scored a low risk. Bycatch and discards in troll and pole and line fisheries typically makes up a small proportion of the total catch (Kellher 2005). Baitfish are typically used in troll and pole fisheries. The ratio of tuna to baitfish is around 30:1 and in most cases baitfishing makes up a small proportion of the total fishing mortality for baitfish species (Gillet 2012).

Habitat

1 of 5
Very low risk

The seabed effects of the fishery are scored a very low risk. This is because pole and line fish at the surface and do not come in contact with bottom habitats.