Market summary

An overview of the seafood industry in facts and figures including retail and food service sales, imports and exports and landing figures.

Seafood Industry Overview

In the latest 12 months* over the last year 97% of households in GB bought seafood, with their total purchases estimated to be worth around £6.24bn which is 1.3% more than the previous year.

*Nielsen data year ending 5 Nov 2016, Crest data year ending Sept 2016. Source: Nielsen Scan Track and NPD Crest

 

UK Retail Sector 


  • In the last year, ending 5 November 2016, we bought 329,592 tonnes of seafood for £3.13b.
  • Overall volume increased by 875 tonnes, 0.3% when compared to Year End 7 November 2015. This growth was accompanied by overall price per kg inflation of 0.8% to £9.49 per kg, driving sales value growth of 1%, £32.5m.
  • Only the chilled sector experience growth of volume 3.7%, 5,570 tonnes and value sales 3.1%, £61.2m but slight price deflation of 0.6% to £13.03 per kg. The frozen sector saw sales value growth of 0.5%, £3.2m driven by 2.3% inflation as
    sales volume declined 1.8%, 1,949 tonnes. Whilst ambient (shelf stable tins, jars, pouches) sales value declined 7.0%, £31.9m due to volume declined 3.8%, 2,746 tonnes compounded by price deflation of 3.3% bringing price per kg to £6.08.
  • The top species by sales value remain the same as the previous year with salmon, cod, tuna, warm-water prawns, haddock and cold-water prawns maintaining their positions. The only species which have changed their ranking positions are:
    crab +1, sole -1, sea-bream +1, kipper -1, lobster +2, squid (calamari) -1, anchovy -1, crayfsh +2, pilchards -1, cockles -1.

Source: AC Nielsen ScanTrack YE 05.11.16

Chilled vs frozen seafood retail sales 1993 - 2016

Chilled vs Frozen seafood retails sales

Source: Nielsen Scantrack

top 35 species by value and volume

 

Seafood sales 2006 - 2016

Seafood sales

Source: AC Nielsen ScanTrack 05.11.16

 

Share of trade between major retailers - total fish

Total fish - 52 week - share of trade by valueShare of trade total fish

Source: AC Nielsen ScanTrack 05.11.16

Consumers and Consumption


  • 72% of UK adults do not know that it is recommended that they eat two portions of fsh a week, one of which should be oily (1).
  • Almost a third (32%) of UK adults who eat one or less portions of fsh a week claim that it is the cost of fsh that prevents them from eating more fish(1).
  • Of those UK adults who eat at least one portion of fsh a week, 43% are doing so as they "try and have a balanced diet" and 35% do so because of the "general health benefts of eating fish"(1).
  • Amongst UK adults who ever eat fsh, 47% claim to regularly (at least once a month) eat cod, 39% regularly eat salmon, 37% tuna, 26% haddock and 23% prawns(1).
  • Almost a quarter (24%) of UK adults spontaneously (i.e. without prompting) know that omega-3 is one of the health benefts of eating fsh. 15% say that it is good for you because it is low in fat and 15% mention fsh oils / oils or essential oils. 13% say it is a good source of protein and 11% describe fish as brain food(1).
  • When prompted, 50% of UK adults see fsh as having healthy heart benefits. 49% say that fsh contributes to healthy skin, hair and nails and 48% that it helps contribute to the maintenance of normal brain function. 28% associate fish with
    maintaining healthy blood pressure and 23% that it helps maintain healthy vision(1).
  • When told of the multitude of health benefits of fish 66% of UK adults agree that they are encouraged to eat more fish than they already do and 78% agree that they feel encouraged to specifcally eat two portions of fsh a week. This demonstrates that once people are made aware of the many health benefts of eating fish they are encouraged to up their intake(1).
  • The top five seafood species in the 52 weeks to 21 May 2016 in retail by volume were salmon, cod, tuna, warm-water prawns and haddock(2).
  • Over the long term (eight years to 21 May 2016) out of the top ten species only salmon, warm-water prawns, mixed seafood pollock and seabass were in true growth. Traditional species like cod, tuna, haddock, cold-water prawns and
    mackerel were in volume decline(2).
  • Salmon consumption has continued to grow over the past eight years despite a 36% increase in price(2).
  • In retail chilled seafood was the only seafood sector consistently in growth throughout austerity. In the eight years to 21 May 2016 chilled seafood value grew by 29% and volume by 10%. In the same period frozen seafood value fell by -5%
    and volume by -22% and ambient seafood fell by -7.8% by value and -37% by volume(2).
  • The market share of chilled seafood in the year to 21 May 2016 by volume was 46% and 64% by value followed by frozen and ambient(2).
  • A variety of sources place seafood consumption in GB at 8.2kg per person per year. This would extrapolate to 8.5kg per person per year for the UK(2).

Source:
1 YouGov 2 a Week study December 2016
2 Seafood Consumption factsheet October 2016

Trends in UK household purchases of fish Data from 1974 - 2014Trends in UK household purchases

Source: DEFRA Family Food 2014

UK Seafood Industry


  • In 2015, there were 6,553 registered fshing vessels, a reduction of 5% since 2006.  Of these vessels 2,017 are classifed as inactive and 1,710 are classifed as 'low activity', referring to vessels with average landings of less than £10,000 per year.
  • Excluding inactive vessels, the fleet in 2015 comprised 3,301 vessels under 10m in length and 1,235 over 10m.
  • There were an estimated 12,107 fshermen in the UK in 2015, down 6% since 2005.  Of these, 5,569 were based in England, 851 in Wales, 4,828 in Scotland and 859 in Northern Ireland. Part-time fshermen accounted for 16 percent of the total, down 2% since 2005.

Source: UK Sea Fisheries Annual Statistics Report 2015 (MMO)

UK Landings


  • In 2015, UK vessels landed 708,000 tonnes of seafood into the UK and abroad with a value of £775 million. Compared with 2014, this represents a 7% decrease in quantity and a 10% decrease in value and was mainly driven by the pelagic sector.
    Average frst sale price of demersal (whitefish and flatfish) and shellfish species fell 2% and 5% respectively between 2014 and 2015, while the price of pelagic (oily) species fell 15%.
  • 60% of fish caught by the UK fleet was landed in the UK. Landings in the UK made up 71% of fshing income for UK vessels.
  • By quantity landed, pelagic species accounted for around 55% of all landings by UK boats in 2015, with demersal fish and shellfsh making up around 24% and 21% respectively. The quantity of pelagic fish landed decreased by 11% between 2014 and 2015. Demersal and shellfish landings were largely static in 2014 and 2015.
  • By value, demersal fish accounted for almost 40% of total landings with shellfish comprising just over 35 and pelagic fsh at 27%.

Source: UK Sea Fisheries Annual Statistics Report 2015 (MMO)

UK landings by UK and foreign vessels 2010 - 2015 

UK landing by UK & Foreign vessels

MMO: The Fishing Industry In 2015 - Landings

Landings into the UK by UK vessels: 2010 - 2015(a)
_ QUANTITY ('000 TONNES) VALUE (£ MILLION)
_ 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Bass 0.7 0.8 0.8 1.0 0.6 5.4 5.6 5.6 7.3 5.3
Brill 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 1.7 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6
Cod 12.7 12.7 13.0 14.0 15.4 27.5 24.9 25.8 27.8 29.5
Dogfish 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.6 1.6 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.3
Gurnard 1.5 1.8 1.8 1.3 1.6 1.1 1.2 1.2 0.9 1.0
Haddock 28.3 34.0 38.7 35.4 32.4 34.6 35.7 43.5 49.4 44.2
Hake 6.7 6.5 6.5 8.5 8.8 12.5 13.5 16.1 19.7 20.9
Halibut 0.1 0.1 .. .. 0.1 0.9 0.6 0.5 0.3 0.4
Lemon sole 1.6 2.5 2.5 2.3 1.8 5.9 6.7 7.6 7.9 7.3
Ling 4.2 4.1 4.0 4.4 4.1 6.2 5.6 5.5 5.4 5.3
Megrim 3.2 3.3 4.0 3.3 3.1 10.5 8.7 9.1 8.6 7.6
Monks or anglers 11.8 10.3 10.1 11.4 14.3 39.5 31.9 30.3 31.4 34.8
Plaice 3.0 3.4 4.1 3.5 3.5 3.6 3.7 4.0 3.6 3.6
Pollack (lythe) 1.9 1.8 1.6 1.9 1.6 4.4 3.9 3.4 3.4 3.1
Saithe 12.7 11.0 12.9 11.1 9.9 13.4 11.3 11.0 10.2 8.5
Sand eels .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
Skates and rays 2.7 2.6 2.6 2.4 2.4 3.9 3.5 3.3 2.7 2.8
Sole 1.9 1.7 1.8 1.8 1.4 16.3 13.9 12.7 12.4 10.3
Turbot 0.4 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.5 4.2 3.6 3.7 4.2 4.2
Whiting 9.7 10.8 12.0 11.1 10.7 11.3 10.9 11.5 11.8 11.0
Witch 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.6 1.1 1.1 0.8 0.7 0.7
Other demersal (b) 3.9 3.4 3.9 34.2 3.4 5.8 4.8 5.5 5.7 6.2
TOTAL DEMERSAL 108.5 112.9 122.6 119.9 118.3 209.8 193.0 202.9 215.2 208.8
Blue whiting 1.6 6.4 8.2 9.7 12.1 0.6 1.8 1.8 1.3 2.0
Herring 31.3 38.2 37.5 38.3 38.6 15.3 18.6 13.6 10.5 13.4
Horse Mackerel 8.9 8.9 2.5 3.1 2.9 3.1 2.8 0.9 1.1 1.3
Mackerel 94.4 67.8 78.2 128.2 94.8 106.8 63.8 70.1 105.5 60.6
Sardines 3.5 4.3 3.7 3.4 4.2 0.9 1.1 1.0 0.8 1.6
Other pelagic 4.8 6.8 4.8 5.7 3.8 1.1 1.5 1.0 2.1 0.8
TOTAL PELAGIC 144.3 132.3 134.9 188.4 156.4 127.7 89.5 88.4 121.4 79.6
Cockles 3.2 2.2 10.1 10.2 11.2 2.7 1.5 5.3 7.9 5.7
Crabs 28.8 29.7 29.1 32.5 29.1 38.4 38.6 38.9 44.2 39.2
Cuttlefish 3.3 5.3 3.7 3.1 6.0 8.8 10.7 6.5 6.5 10.6
Lobsters 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.4 3.1 32.4 31.0 29.9 33.3 32.1
Mussels 1.9 0.7 0.5 0.2 1.0 0.2 0.4 0.2 0.1 0.8
Nephrops 34.3 32.6 28.3 30.3 25.7 111.1 110.4 86.0 98.2 81.8
Scallops 53.0 53.6 48.7 38.5 40.7 62.8 67.4 62.6 58.2 64.0
Shrimps and prawns 0.4 1.0 0.9 0.6 0.3 0.7 2.4 2.4 1.4 0.8
Squid 2.9 1.8 1.8 2.9 1.8 11.6 6.4 7.0 9.2 6.4
Whelks 13.9 16.4 20.0 19.7 20.9 8.9 11.1 13.7 16.2 18.6
Other shellfish 2.5 2.4 1.8 1.1 1.3 5.6 6.1 5.4 3.6 4.0
TOTAL SHELLFISH 147.4 148.8 147.9 142.5 141.0 283.3 286.0 257.8 278.8 264.0
Hide demersal
Show pelagic
Show shelfish
TOTAL ALL SPECIES 400.2 394.0 405.4 450.8 415.7 620.8 568.6 549.0 615.4 552.4

Source: MMO: The Fishing Industry In 2015 - Landings

(a) Landings data include transhipments and Islands figures.

(b) Includes fish roes and livers.

UK Ports


Top 10 UK ports - landings by UK vessels: 2015 By volume

Top 10 UK ports landings by UK vessels by volume

Source: MMO: The Fishing Industry In 2015 - Landings

 

Top 10 UK ports - landing by UK vessels: 2015 By value

Top 10 UK port landings by UK vessels 

Source: MMO: The Fishing Industry In 2015 - Landings

 UK Seafood Imports


  • In the UK* approximately 66% of the seafood value, 52% of the seafood volume which enters the supply chain is imported from abroad or landed by foreign ships
  • Within the last year a total of 717,583 tonnes of seafood worth £2.9bn was imported which was 4.1% more in terms of volume and 7.6% more in terms of value in comparison to 2015.
  • The average price per kg of imported seafood has increased by 3.3% from £3.91 in 2015 to £4.03 in Sept 2016.
  • In terms of species import values, with 21.1% sales growth salmon has reclaimed frst position from cod which experienced 8.9% growth and tuna has maintained its third position with 0.4% growth in sales value. The other species that have
    experienced changes in value of more than 10% are: scallops (85.9%), lobster (27.1%) and monkfsh (+18.7%) whilst nephrops (-18.9%), crabs (-15.3%) and cold water prawns (-15%) imports have declined.
  • These shifts in species is reflected in the performance of the countries who import to the UK. Looking at the top importing counties by value, Iceland has maintained its number one position, the Faroe Islands are now in second place (was sixth last year). Germany has maintained their third position, whilst China is now fourth (was second last year), and ffth position is still held by Denmark. Vietnam increased their imports moving up one place to sixth, whilst Sweden has moved two places and is now the seventh largest importer. Canada's imports fell moving them down four places to eight. The Netherlands improved their position to ninth (from tenth last year) and India is now ranked tenth which is two places higher than 2015.

* Source: Marine Management Organisation 2015, fnalised 2015 trade data from HMRC via BTS, Cefas 2013-2014 data converted to £s and not adjusted for inflation

 top import species

 

top 20 import countries

UK Seafood Exports


  • The UK's exports includes a large proportion of our domestic catch as this gains a higher value in foreign markets. Over the last year export volumes have fallen 5.6% to 444,151 tonnes whilst the value has increased 8.7% to be worth £1.5bn due to 15.2% inflation raising the average price per kg to £3.41.
  • Despite falling volumes (1.2%) Salmon maintained its position as the UK's top export as 4.5% inflation has driven increased value (3.3%). Scallops growth has continued in terms of value (27.8%) and volume (17.4%) moving them to be the UK's second largest species. Nephrops growth was purely driven by inflation as volume exports declined (0.2%) so are now in third position. Mackerel and crabs have maintained their fourth and ffth positions respectively.
  • The top eight export markets for the UK remain the same with no changes in value ranking: France, U.S.A., Spain, Irish Republic, Italy, China, Netherlands, Germany. All of these countries have bought more seafood by value except the
    USA which spent 5.6% less than in 2015. Denmark climbed three places to be ninth replacing Nigeria who are now fourteenth and South Korea maintained tenth position.

Source: HMRC via British Trade Statistics YE September 2016

top export species

top 20 export countries

UK Sea Fish Processing Sector


  • In 2016 the UK sea fish processing industry provided around 13,554 full-time jobs across 307 units. The industry is consolidating with the number of sites reducing and average employment per site increasing over the last five years.
  • Humberside and the Grampian region of Scotland dominate the sea fish processing industry in terms of full-time equivalent employment (over 60% of total industry employment in 2016 located within these regions).
  • In 2014 the industry had an estimated turnover of over £3 billion of which £184 million was operating profit.
  • In 2014 the industry contributed over £550 million in Gross Value Added to the UK economy.

Source: 2016 UK Seafood Processing Industry Report (Seafish)

UK Foodservice Sector


  • To year end Sept 2016, consumers spent £53.3 billion on eating out of home, an increase of 3% on the previous year. The industry has remained buoyant through a 1.3% increase in visits, a 1.6% increase in the number of servings and a 1.9%
    increase in the average eater spend driven by rising prices.
  • This positive performance trend was experienced by all channels except work / college / university canteens which experienced a fall in sales value despite higher prices as consumers visited the channel less often.
  • Consumers spent approximately £3.1b on eating seafood out of home, an increase of +1.5% on the previous year. Seafood servings increased 6.8% this year was driven by positive performance in all channels, except work / college / university
    canteens which saw a 9% decline in their seafood servings.
  • Fried fsh has increased its dominance of the sector by 1.2% to hold 36.8% share of seafood servings and fsh/seafood sandwiches now hold 29.2% share. Cod has also increased its lead in the out of home market and now accounts for 31.7% of all fish servings / 14.8% share of all seafood servings. The other seafood items that have experienced an increase in the number of servings are prawns, haddock, scampi and mussels. In contrast, the number of mackerel, calamari, tuna and
    salmon servings declined

Source: NPD Crest 52-Weeks Ending Sept'16

UK Fish and Chip sector


  • There are approximately 10,500 takeaway fish and chip shops in the UK, collectively serving around 380 million meals per annum.
  • It is estimated that in the region of 80,000 people are employed in the takeaway
    fish and chip shop sector.
  • The most popular species of fish consumed via the fish and chip shop sector are cod and haddock, followed by a range of other species such as plaice, hake, coley, whiting, and lemon sole. Many species of shellfish are also increasingly available
    via fish and chip shops - principally breaded or battered scampi but also species such as scallops and prawns. Haddock is  the usual fsh of choice in Scotland, Yorkshire, other parts of northern England and many parts of the Midlands - while
    cod is the usual fish of choice in most other parts of the UK. Plaice is regularly enjoyed by an older demographic of consumer.
  • Most (approximately 95%) of the cod sold by UK fish and chip shops is caught in the Arctic waters of the Barents Sea and Iceland. In England, most of the haddock eaten comes from the Barents Sea and Iceland - both of these being supplied in
    FAS (frozen at sea) fllet format. In Scotland, haddock is much more likely to come from the North Sea via landings into the port of Peterhead.
  • The largest ever portion of fish and chips weighed 47.75 kg and was served by Fish and Chips@London Road, Enfeld, Middlesex, London on 30 July 2012.
  • Popular accompaniments to fish and chip meals include mushy peas, salt and vinegar, tomato ketchup, curry sauce and pickled onions.
  • It is estimated that 80% of the UK population visit fish and chip shops at least once a year, while 22% of people visit a fish and chip shop every week. Friday is still the busiest day of the week for most fish and chip shops.
  • 56% of UK consumers buy fish and chips from a takeaway outlet to eat in the home as a family meal.
  • Fish and chips is one of the least adulterated prepared foods that we can eat; wild caught fsh, freshly harvested potatoes, some flour for batter and an oil or fat for the cooking medium.
  • A serving of fsh and chips provides a third of the recommended daily allowance of vitamins for a man and nearly half for a woman. A portion of fish and chips provides the body with carbohydrate, vitamins B6 and B12, vitamin C, iron,
    calcium, phosphorous, as well as the trace elements iodine, fluorine, zinc and some important dietary fibre.

Source: Seafish

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