RASS Records

Northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis) in East Canada, West Greenland and international waters in NAFO Sub-areas 0 and 1, Demersal otter trawl



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Content Last Updated
09 March 2018
Stock
Management


Northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis) is found in the Northwest Atlantic from Baffin Bay to the Gulf of Maine where the highest population densities occur in water temperatures of 0-4?C, most frequently at depths of 150-600 m and typically over soft muddy substrates. As a protandric hermaphrodite, northern shrimp mature first as a male but change sex at an age of around 3 to 7 years old and complete the remainder of their live cycle as a female. Shrimp spawn from late summer to autumn, and females carry their eggs until spring when the larvae hatch. Some females may survive to repeat the spawning process in succeeding years. Natural mortality seems to be most pronounced immediately following hatching, and most shrimp do not live past age 5. Newly hatched shrimp spend three to four months as pelagic larvae, and at the end of this period they move to deeper waters and take up the life cycle of adults. This species can reach a maximum total length of 120 mm for males and 165 mm for females. They mainly feed on detritus and plankton, and are preyed on by finfish, birds and marine mammals (Skúladóttir, 1998; Idoine, 2006; Aschan et al., 2012).

 

The widely distributed northern shrimp population inhabiting the waters of East Canada, West Greenland and NAFO Sub-areas 0 and 1 is assessed as a single stock. The northern shrimp stock off West Greenland is distributed mainly in NAFO Subarea 1, but a small part of the stock intrudes into the eastern edge of Division 0A. Canada has defined Shrimp Fishing Area (SFA) 1 to be the part of Division 0A, lying east of the deepest water in the Davis Strait.

 



References



Aschan, M., Powles, H., Angel, J. 2012. MSC Assessment Report for the Canadian Offshore Northern Shrimp (Pandalus borealis) trawl fishery - Shrimp Fishing Area 1. Client: Canadian Association of Prawn Producers (CAPP) and the Northern Coalition (NC). Version: Final Report Draft. 176 pp.

 

Idoine, J. 2006. Northern shrimp. Status of Fishery Resources off the Northeastern US NEFSC - Resource Evaluation and Assessment Division. 13 pp.

 

 

Skúladóttir, U. 1998. Size at sexual maturity of female Northern Shrimp (Pandalus borealis Krøyer) in the Denmark Strait 1985–93 and a comparison with the nearest Icelandic shrimp populations. J. Northw. Atl. Fish. Sci., 24: 27–37.

The status of the northern shrimp stock in East Canada, West Greenland and international waters in NAFO Sub-areas 0 and 1 has been scored a very low risk. This is because the stock biomass estimate in 2017 is above the value giving maximum sustainable yield (BMSY) and the total mortality estimate, which includes fishing and natural mortality is well below the advised limit (Zmsy). The risk of the stock being outside safe biological limits in 2017 is below 1%.



The management of northern shrimp in East Canada, West Greenland and international waters in NAFO Sub-areas 0 and 1 has been scored a low risk. This is because management decisions are informed by an annual stock assessment, catches of northern shrimp have been below the TAC for six out of the last ten years and there is a comprehensive regulatory framework in place. Management measures that have been established adequately protect the stock from overexploitation, and regulations are enforced and independently verified.



The bycatch risk of this fishery has been scored a moderate risk. This is because bycatch of non-target species in the demersal otter trawl fishery is low (< 5% of total shrimp catch weight), all vessels in the fishery have taken steps to reduce bycatch of groundfish by using a sorting grid and discarding of shrimp is prohibited.



The habitat risk of this fishery has been scored a moderate risk. Although demersal otter trawls interact with the seabed, all vessels in the fishery have taken steps to reduce their habitat impact by using appropriate gear technology and an area closed to fishing activities has been established to protect vulnerable marine habitats.



TypeCurrent Risk StatusOutlookReason
StockLowStableThe status of the stock is likely to be stable in future given the current high biomass and low level of exploitation relative to reference points.
ManagementLowStableThe management of this stock is likely to remain stable in the future given that the stock assessment is updated annually and control measures are in place to adequately protect the stock from overexploitation. Regulations are enforced and independently verified using several surveillance measures.
BycatchModerateStableThe bycatch impact of the demersal otter trawl fishery is expected to remain stable in the future. Bycatch levels in this fishery are low ranging from 1.8% to 6% of the total catch weight of shrimp between 1999 and 2007. All vessels have taken steps to minimise bycatch by using a sorting grid and through best practice.
HabitatModerateImprovingThe habitat impact of the demersal otter trawl fishery is expected to improve in the future. Northern shrimp are caught in this fishery at depths of 200-300 m, which does not overlap with major areas of vulnerable marine habitat. Mitigation measures are continuously under development and will like reduce the risks further.

Nutrition information from 100g raw product

Rich in:
Omega-3
Protein
Vitamin B12
Vitamin E
Selenium
Good Source Of:
Phosphorus
Copper
low
Energy
70 (kcal)
4%
na
Fat
0.9 (g)
1%
low
Saturates
0.2 (g)
1%
low
Sugar
0 (g)
0%
na
Salt
1.5 (g)
25%