ILO Recruitment. Fair recruitment general principles and operational guidelines

Organisation
International Labour Organization
Location
Type
Sector
The objective of these general principles and operational guidelines for fair recruitment is to inform the current and future work of the ILO and of other organisations, national legislatures, and the social partners on promoting and ensuring fair recruitment.

hese principles and guidelines are derived from a number of sources, including international labour standards and ILO instruments among others.

General principles and operational guidelines for fair recruitment and definition of recruitment fees and related costs. May 2019.
The principles and guidelines aim to inform the current and future work of the ILO and of other organizations, national legislatures, and the social partners on promoting and ensuring fair recruitment. The definition of recruitment fees and related costs recognizes the principle that workers shall not be charged directly or indirectly, in whole or in part, any fees or related costs for their recruitment. This comprehensive definition is guided by international labour standards and should be read together with the principles and guidelines. This guidance is developed within the framework of the Fair Recruitment Initiative, which aims to help prevent human trafficking, protect the rights of workers (including migrant workers) from abusive and fraudulent practices during the recruitment and placement process, reduce the cost of labour migration and enhance development gains.

New tool for labour migration researchers and policy makers. 4 March 2020. The ILO has created a map that displays a global database of 90 national laws, policies and regulations (policies) that have defined recruitment fees and related costs.

ILO report. Recruitment fees and related costs: What migrant workers from Cambodia, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, and Myanmar pay to work in Thailand. April 2020.
The ILO report shows that the average cost for a migrant worker to come and work in Thailand was USD 461, equivalent to 2 months of salary. Migrants who used an agency or broker ended up paying USD 100 more, on average. Out of the 1,200 workers surveyed, a quarter were given a job without a written contract, and only one in four were paid at least the minimum wage.

ILO publishes recruitment recommendations for policy makers and regulators. May 2020.
The International Labour Organization’s (ILO) Montreal Recommendations on Recruitment: A Road Map towards Better Regulation aims to provide policymakers and regulators with guidance and ideas to improve regulation and oversight of international recruitment and protection of migrant workers.


Significance for seafood businesses: 

This is guidance specifically covering the fair recruitment of workers within the seafood industry. Sourcing seafood that is accredited to a standard that has a social component provides reassurance that the seafood you are purchasing has been independently verified concerning social issues.


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