Turbot in the North Sea (ICES subarea IV), Gillnets

Psetta maxima
Content last updated
12 January 2016
Stock
Turbot in the North Sea (ICES subarea IV)
Management
EU
Stock Status
3 of 5
Moderate risk
Management
3 of 5
Moderate risk
Bycatch
3 of 5
Moderate risk
Habitat
2 of 5
Low risk

Stock status

3 of 5
Moderate risk

Turbot in Sub area IV has been scored a moderate risk. Recruitment is variable without a trend. Fishing mortality (F) is estimated to have decreased since the mid-1990s and has been stable for the past ten years. SSB has increased since the late 1990s.

Management

3 of 5
Moderate risk

The management of Turbot in Sub area IV has been scored a moderate risk. This is because management decisions are informed by an analytical (although data limited) stock assessment, and there is a complex regulatory framework in place. There is concern over the use of a combined TAC for turbot and brill which carries the risk of one of the species being overexploited.

Bycatch

3 of 5
Moderate risk

The bycatch risk for this fishery has been scored a moderate risk. This is because demersal gillnets risk the incidental capture of marine mammals and sharks and in some waters diving seabirds. Ghost fishing, where lost gear continues to fish is a potential problem in the gillnet fishery. There are strong incentives for fishermen to avoid losing nets. If they are lost in areas where there is strong wave and tidal action such as the North Sea, gill nets are likely to become ineffective quite rapidly.

Habitat

2 of 5
Low risk

The habitat risk of this fishery has been scored a low risk. This is because habitat damage tends to be low as the gear is static and therefore has limited impact on the seafloor when compared to a towed gear. Penetration and abrasion effects are limited to shooting and hauling the gear. There is also potential for the gear to become snagged on biogenic features.