Turbot in the Celtic Sea, Bay of Biscay and Iberian Coast, Gillnet

Psetta maxima
Content last updated
01 February 2016
Stock
Turbot in ICES divisions VIIe, f, h, j and IXa and sub area VIII (Celtic Sea, Bay of Biscay and Iberian waters)
Management
EU
Stock Status
4 of 5
High risk
Management
4 of 5
High risk
Bycatch
4 of 5
High risk
Habitat
1 of 5
Very low risk

Stock status

4 of 5
High risk

Turbot in Division VIIe, f, j, h and sub area VIII and IXa has been scored as high risk. This is because turbot has a medium vulnerability score and the population trend is unknown due to the limited information available.

Management

4 of 5
High risk

The management of Turbot in Division VIIe, f, h, j and sub area VIII and IXa has been scored a high risk. This is because there are no management decisions or assessments of stock status for turbot, there is only minimal data being collected and there are no specific management measures in place to restrict harvesting. However, there are management measures in place to control effort in the fisheries.

Bycatch

4 of 5
High risk

The bycatch in the demersal gillnet fishery has been scored a high risk. This is because there is a risk of bycatches of non-target species and cetaceans in the fisheries in some of the areas, and there has been limited monitoring and no estimates of the effects on populations or technical measures introduced to prevent catches. The EU landings obligation is intended to reduce discarding of TAC species over the period up to 2020 and technical measures are being developed to reduce incidental catches of endangered, protected and threatened species. EU regulations specify the use of acoustic deterrents on gillnets, depending on area, to reduce by catch.

Habitat

1 of 5
Very low risk

The habitat impact of the demersal gillnet fishery has been scored a very low risk. This is because set gillnets have relatively little impact on the seabed compared to other fishing activities. Lost or abandoned gillnets can get entangled on habitat features and weights can cause surface penetration of the seabed. Some spatial management is in place to protect vulnerable areas.