Queen Scallop, ICES Subarea VII, Scallop dredge

Aequipecten opercularis
Content last updated
01 February 2016
Stock
Queen scallop, ICES Subarea VII
Management
Numerous stock units are owned/shared by U.K., France and Ireland with variable management approaches
Stock Status
3 of 5
Moderate risk
Management
3 of 5
Moderate risk
Bycatch
4 of 5
High risk
Habitat
4 of 5
High risk

Stock status

3 of 5
Moderate risk

The Queen scallop fishery of the ICES area VII was scored moderate risk. It is because most of the stock units of the queen scallop in the ICES area VII are not assessed except for grounds round the Isle of Man; trends are unknown, and there are some signs of overexploitation in the mentioned Isle of Man stock. However, the species is assigned a relatively low vulnerability score (FishBase, 2014).

Management

3 of 5
Moderate risk

The management of the Queen scallop fishery has been scored a moderate risk. The only stock area with dynamic fishery management is around the Isle of Man and has been generally effective although it was not able to prevent the suspension of the MSC certification (Suspension Notice, 2014). Other control measures are considered to be moderately effective and vary throughout the area VII although there are very few regulations on the UK fishery for queen scallops. The EU minimum shell size is 40 mm (50 mm for the Isle of Man) and it is generally uneconomic to process queens less than 55 mm. There are no closed seasons for queen scallops or restrictions on fishing time or catches in the U.K. (Beukers-Stewart, Beukers-Stewart. 2009).

Bycatch

4 of 5
High risk

The bycatch risk of this fishery has been scored as high risk. The bycatch by boat dredges in scallop fisheries is high and poorly reported (Beukers-Stewart, Beukers-Stewart. 2009), but the issue will be soon regulated by the landings obligation within the Common Fisheries Policy reform.

Habitat

4 of 5
High risk

The habitat risk of this fishery has been scored as high risk. This is because the scallop fisheries may disturb biological communities both directly and by changing the physical attributes of the areas being fished. However, there is some localised spatial management in place where fishing using boat dredges banned.