Northeast Arctic saithe (ICES subarea 1 and 2), demersal otter trawl

Pollachius virens
Content last updated
02 August 2017
Stock
Northeast Arctic saithe
Management
Norway
Stock Status
2 of 5
Low risk
Management
1 of 5
Very low risk
Bycatch
4 of 5
High risk
Habitat
3 of 5
Moderate risk

Stock status

2 of 5
Low risk

Northeast Arctic Saithe (ICES Subareas 1 and 2) has been scored low risk. The decrease in Spawning Stock Biomass (SSB) has been reversed with an increasing trend since 2011 At present SSB is above the Bpa level, which is used as a trigger level for action within the management plan. The optimal rate of fishing mortality for Maximum Sustained Yield (FMSY)is not defined, but the fishing mortality is inside precautionary levels (below Fpa) and therefore the stock is not at risk of depletion. In recent years fishing mortality has fluctuated around the management plan target value of 0.32.  It is currently indicated to be below this level.

Management

1 of 5
Very low risk

Northeast Arctic Saithe has been scored as very low risk. This is because scientific stock assessment is carried out regularly based both on fishery dependent and independent data and there is management plan for the stock. There is also adequate enforcement of fishery control rules in Norwegian waters where the large majority of the catch is taken.

Bycatch

4 of 5
High risk

The bycatch in fisheries for trawl fisheries on Northeast Arctic Saithe in ICES Subareas 1 and 2 has been scored a high risk. This is because there are bycatches of golden redfish (Sebastes norvegicus), which is outside safe biological limits and Norwegian coastal cod which is a low level.

Habitat

3 of 5
Moderate risk

The habitat impact of the demersal otter trawls fishery has been scored a moderate risk. This is because, although demersal otter trawls are likely to have effects on seabed ecosystems, there is good understanding of these effects in this area. Mitigation measures based on this understanding, including designated marine protected areas in Norwegian and Russian waters, as well as measures which require fishers to avoid vulnerable habitats if they encounter them, are in place. Fishers tend to avoid vulnerable habitats to avoid damage to gear and reduced quality of catches.   Continuing efforts to map seabed habitats, understand the implications of changes in ice cover due to ocean warming and reduce the physical effects of gear through technological improvements are aimed at reducing these effects.