Loligo squids in the Indo-Pacific, Light fishing using fishing nets

Uroteuthis chinensis, Uroteuthis duvaucelii, Uroteuthis edulis
Content last updated
24 October 2014
Stock
Loligo squids in the Indo-Pacific
Management
Not managed
Stock Status
3 of 5
Moderate risk
Management
5 of 5
Very high risk
Bycatch
4 of 5
High risk
Habitat
1 of 5
Very low risk

Stock status

3 of 5
Moderate risk

Indo-Pacific Loligo squids have been scored a moderate risk. This is because the stock has a relatively low vulnerability score of 20/100 for Uroteuthis chinensis, 14/100 for Uroteuthis duvauceli, and 30/100 for Uroteuthis edulis (SeaLifeBase, 2014), and the population trend is unknown. With a vulnerability score below 31 and either an unknown or declining stock status they should be considered as at moderate risk. From a biological point of view the moderate risk status is supported by all-year-round spawning and recruitment in both species (so absence of a season when the species is particularly vulnerable to fishing), presence of paralarval stage allowing exchange of recruitment between spawning grounds, very high growth rates, short life span of 6-12 months, and broad feeding spectra allowing squids to prey on anything of convenient size (Jereb, Roper, 2010; Dutton, 2013).

Management

5 of 5
Very high risk

The management of Indo-Pacific Loligo squids has been scored a very high risk. This is because monitoring is ineffective and there is no reliable data on landings throughout the species’ range. There is no international or regional fishery management for squid; management and any enforcement measures are up to the discretion of individual countries within their exclusive economic zones. Excess capacity, excess fishing effort, and poor enforcement all contribute to the difficulties in effectively managing these squid fisheries. In India and Thailand, open access fisheries also exacerbate the issues (Dutton, 2013).

Bycatch

4 of 5
High risk

The bycatch in the light fishing fishery for Indo-Pacific Loligo squids has been scored a high risk. This is because bycatch by fish nets, particularly hand nets, are due to not only the squids being attracted to the light field at night, but also numerous other fish species.

Habitat

1 of 5
Very low risk

The habitat impact of light fishing fishery for Indo-Pacific Loligo squids has been scored very low risk. This is because fishing gear has limited interactions with the seabed due to the artisanal nature of the fisheries. Squids are captured at the surface by hand nets (scoop nets) or castnets (http://castnet.yaskafishing.com/company.asp), called in India as ‘paag’, both having no contact with seafloor. The only impact might be caused by the boat anchor. However, the species are fished above sandy and muddy bottoms hence outside of vulnerable coral reef areas.