Haddock in the North Sea, Skagerrak and West of Scotland, Demersal seine

Melanogrammus aeglefinus
Content last updated
18 September 2019
Stock
Haddock in Subarea 4 and Divisions 3a West and 6a (North Sea, Skagerrak, and West of Scotland)
Management
European Union
Stock Status
2 of 5
Low risk
Management
3 of 5
Moderate risk
Bycatch
3 of 5
Moderate risk
Habitat
2 of 5
Low risk

Stock status

2 of 5
Low risk

North Sea and West of Scotland Haddock has been scored a low risk. This is because the spawning stock biomass and fishing mortality are at levels considered to be sustainable (inside precautionary reference levels), though fishing mortality is above the optimum required to achieve Maximum Sustainable Yield (FMSY).

The large variation in advised TAC (from c 69,000 t in 2015 to c 30,000 t in 2019) in recent years is as a consequence of the large variation in year class strength which is characteristic of this stock.  Recruitment since 2000 has been low with occasional larger year classes, the size of which is diminishing.

Management

3 of 5
Moderate risk

The management of the North Sea haddock has been scored a moderate risk. The stock is assessed annually by ICES, and has been recently benchmarked with a re-evaluation of the reference points. However, there is some uncertainty as to the effect of the implementation of the Landings Obligation will have on control and accounting for catches because there is a risk of continued undocumented discarding.

Bycatch

3 of 5
Moderate risk

The bycatch risk of this fishery has been scored a moderate risk. This is because the fishery has potential to take and discard at risk stocks such as West of Scotland and North Sea cod.  A range of measures and/or incentives are in place to manage the fisheries, these measures, where adopted, will act to improve the selectivity of the fishery for some other species taken in the same fisheries depending on size and behaviour.

Habitat

2 of 5
Low risk

The habitat risk of this fishery been scored a low risk. This is because the relatively minor impact of the ropes sweeping across the seabed is the most extensive physical effect of this gear on habitat and significant interaction with vulnerable marine habitats is unlikely. No spatial management has been established to reduce the habitat impact of this fishery.