New Health Certificates for Exports to the EU from August

An update following guidance from Defra on changes to seafood export health certificates from 21 August 2021.

Since the end of the transition period, UK seafood has had to comply with certain rules to be accepted onto the EU market. This includes the requirement for each consignment to be accompanied by an export health certificate. The format of these certificates are determined by EU law.

Details of the EU’s new ‘Animal Health Law’ is available on the EUR-Lex website. This law changes the export health certificates used to export seafood to the EU.

On 8 July Defra published two updated export health certificates for fish, crustaceans and molluscs. You can download them from the gov.uk website using the links below:

  • 8361 replaces 8270 – this is to be used for live fish, live crustaceans and products of animal origin from those animals intended for human consumption
  • 8364 replaces 8249 – this is to be used for bivalve molluscs, echinoderms, tunicates and marine gastropods and products of animal origin from those animals intended for human consumption

What are the most significant changes?

1. Some listed species must now complete Part II.2 and have it signed by an Official Veterinarian (OV)

Listed species include Pacific Oysters, European Flat Oysters, Atlantic Salmon, Rainbow Trout and Decapod Crustaceans. They can be found in column 3 of the Annex of Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2018/1882 (link downloads a pdf).

If listed species are farmed and exported to the EU alive, Part II.2 of the certificate must be completed and signed by a vet.

If listed species are farmed and exported to the EU dead for further processing (i.e. not for direct human consumption), Part II.2 must be completed and signed by a vet.

If listed species are farmed and exported to the EU dead for direct human consumption, wrapping or packing, Part II.2 of the certificate can be deleted.

Fish, crustaceans, and molluscs landed by fishing vessels are not required to complete Part II.2.

Species listed in column 4 of the Annex of Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2018/1882 (link downloads a pdf) may act as a vector species if they live in proximity to a listed species. For example, the common edible cockle is named as a disease vector species for the European flat oyster. Where the common edible cockle co-habits or shares a water supply with European flat oysters they are considered a vector species.

Vector species are required to complete Part II.2 and obtain vet certification if farmed and exported to the EU alive.

2. Add registration/approval number (where applicable) of the place of destination.

If the place of destination is an approved establishment, its approval number should be publicly available on the list of Approved EU Food Establishments on the European Commission website.

If the place of destination is a registered establishment, its registration number should be obtained by the exporter.

3. Specify the consignment’s oldest date of production

In Box I.27, you must now specify the earliest date of final production of the items contained in your consignment.

If you use groupage and export to the EU via a logistics hub, you will need to provide this date to the hub. This will allow the certifying officer to identify the oldest production date in the consolidated consignment at the hub.

Contacts

If you have any queries about export health certificates for seafood please contact our Regulation team on regulation@seafish.co.uk.