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Dab in the Celtic Sea and West of Scotland, Demersal otter trawl

fish

Limanda limanda

Content last updated
27th Jan 2016

Stock:
Dab in ICES sub area VII (Celtic Sea and West of Scotland)

Management:
EU

Overview

Dab (Limanda limanda) is a widespread demersal species on the Northeast Atlantic shelf and distributed from the Bay of Biscay to Iceland and Norway, including the Barents Sea and the Baltic. In the North Sea it is one of the most abundant species distributed over the whole area in depths down to 100m, but it was also found occasionally down to depths of 150m. The main concentration of dab can be found in the south eastern North Sea.

 

Dab feeds on a variety of small invertebrates, mainly polychaete worms, shellfish and crustaceans. Early sexual maturation was reported for dab, maturing at ages of 2 to 3 years corresponding to approximately 11 to 14cm. Peak spawning in the south eastern North Sea occurs from February to April. Because of its sedentary nature, dab has proved to be a valuable indicator in eco-toxicological studies.

 

Dab is a by-catch species in fisheries for plaice, sole and demersal roundfish. It is among the most discarded fish species, particularly in the North Sea and catches are mainly from beam and otter trawl fishery on plaice and sole. The largest part of the landings in ICES sub area VII are taken by the France, Belgium and the UK in the Eastern English Channel.

 

Dab in sub area VII remains a data-limited stocks with no TAC or advised ICES catch.

 

References

ICES. 2012. Report of the Working Group on Assessment of New MoU Species (WGNEW), 5 – 9 March 2012, . ICES CM 2012/ACOM:20. 258 pp.

 

ICES. 2013. Report of the Working Group on Assessment of New MoU Species (WGNEW), 18 – 22 March 2013, ICES HQ, Copenhagen, Denmark. ACOM.

Stock Status

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more risk

Dab in sub area VII has been scored as high risk. This is because dab has a medium vulnerability score and the population trend is unknown due to the limited information available.

Dab in sub area VII has been scored as high risk. This is because dab has a medium vulnerability score and the population trend is unknown due to the limited information available.

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Management

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more risk

The management of dab in ICES sub area VII has been scored a high risk. This is because there are no management decisions or assessments of stock status for dab, there is only minimal data being collected and there are no specific management measures in place to restrict harvesting although many of the fisheries on the stock are limited by effort in terms of how many days the vessels can fish per annum.

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Bycatch

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more risk

The bycatch in the demersal otter trawl fishery has been scored a high risk. This is because bycatch of non-target species in the demersal otter trawl is considerably higher when compared to other fisheries in the world. Demersal otter trawls have the potential to take relatively high quantities of bycatch of vulnerable species in certain circumstances.

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Habitat

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more risk

The habitat impact of the demersal otter trawl fishery has been scored a moderate risk. This is because demersal otter trawls interact with the seabed resulting in abrasion and penetration from ground gear, sweeps and bridles. Most of the fishing activity is concentrated in core areas on sandy grounds that have been traditionally fished. Furthermore, although there are several areas of deep water habitat protected from fishing there is uncertainty about the location and sensitivity of some sensitive seabed habitats so these remain at risk.

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Outlook

Current risk status Outlook Reason
Stock High Unknown The status of the stock and reference point for long-term sustainability and fishing mortality is unknown. Vulnerability has been scored as moderate and temporal trends in spawning stock biomass remain unclear.
Management High Stable The management of the stock is likely to remain stable in the future. The EU Common Fisheries Policy is going through reform and there is some uncertainty on how this will impact fisheries management in this area.
Bycatch High Improving The bycatch impacts of the fishery are likely to improve in the future. Technical and spatial management measures are continuously under development and will likely reduce the risk further.
Habitat Moderate Improving The habitat impacts of the fishery are likely to improve in the future. Demersal otter trawls disturb seabed habitats, but a range of Marine Protected Areas have been established in the Celtic Sea to minimise damage to vulnerable marine habitats.

Type Current Risk Status Outlook Reason

Stock

Management

Bycatch

Habitat

Nutritional Information

 
Energy
74 (kcal)
4%*
LOW
Fat
1.2 (g)
2%*
 
Saturates
No data
No data%*
LOW
Sugar
0 (g)
0%*
 
Salt
0 (g)
0%*

*per 100 g raw

Nutrition information per 100g raw product

Rich in Protein | Vitamin B12 | Selenium

Good Source Of Potassium | Iodine

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