Publications

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Publications & Reports

Publication InformationRelease DateFile Type

A Guide for Ecological Risk Assessment of the Effects of Commercial Fishing (ERAEF)

John Cotter, William Lart

Wild capture marine fisheries are, by definition, dependant on the natural processes of marine ecosystems. Traditionally single species stock assessments have focussed on the dynamics of individual species. However, there is increasing awareness that fisheries assessments should not be separated from their supporting ecosystem. This report reviews ecosystem risk assessessment methods and describes in detail the method evolved in Australia by CSIRO.

March 2011Download PDF

A Guide to the Manufacture of Marinaded Products

M. Myers, N. Edwards, N. Kelly, C. Curr

The pelagic resources of the UK are valued at about £70m. Of this, about 60% are disposed of as whole fish or chilled fillet form. Only abut 20% are sold in some form of added value product and of these about 1% are marinaded. There are opportunities to increase sales of herring particularly by marinading and this report reviews the process by which marinades are made, the raw material specification and the packaging techniques. This report has been produced from a scanned original and may therefore contain some formatting and other inaccuracies. In cases where this affects the technical content, a paper copy of the original report can still be obtained from Seafish.

March 1986Download PDF

A Pilot Pot Fishery for Nephrops Norvegicus off the Northern Ireland coast

ANIFOP AND AFBI

The study was managed by officials from DARD, ANIFPO including the owners of the vessels engaged in the study and AFBI who carried out scientific monitoring of the pilot fishery. With the introduction of the Irish Sea cod recovery programme and its associated temporary sea area closures, several Northern Irish fishing vessels were displaced. They were encouraged to find sustainable alternatives to complete their annual fishing plans. Amongst the fishing vessels affected were four small (under 12 metre) vessels, which had traditionally targeted cod using gill-nets. The closure effectively stopped this fishery. As a result the four vessels, like many of their larger colleagues diversified into the Nephrops fishery using trawls. However, with the increasing costs of fuel and other overheads, combined with reductions in the landed price for Nephrops, the owners of the four vessels, together with the ANIFPO, decided to investigate alternative fishing opportunities. Following internal discussion, and with DARD’s Sea Fisheries Division, an application for funding was submitted to allow sea trials in the “open Irish Sea”, to examine the practicalities of using pots/creels to catch Nephrops. While creels were used in Strangford Lough, and other similar Loughs around Scotland, the possibility of using creels in areas traditionally trawled had not been investigated.

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A Preliminary Study of the Costs of Operating a Lobster Hatchery in Orkney and the Development of an Economic Model for Future Hatchery Programmes

Burton CA & Anderson K

As part of the UK Lobster Stock Enhancement programme, the Sea Fish Industry Authority (Seafish) conducted a series of juvenile lobster (Homarus gammarus) releases in Scapa Flow, Orkney. Hatchery operations and the results of the different trials have been summarised in several reports and articles (Burton 1992, Beard & Wickins 1992, Bannister et al 1994, Burton 1994, Anon 1995, Cook 1995, Burton 1999, Burton in press).

April 2002Download PDF

A Profile of the South Coast Fisheries - Lyme Regis to Selsey Bill

M. Myers

The fishing sector of the Southern Sea Fisheries District, of Lyme Regis to Selsey BIll, is typified by small-boat (below 12m) operators who collectively lack organisation and representation. It is estimated from anecdotal evidence (see p.2) that in the order of 350 fishing boats operate full time from numerous bases seriously lacking in infrastructure support. Most boats are owner operated, with the only fleet operation being that of Johnson’s Sea Enterprises of Portsmouth who operate four large beam trawlers. In excess of 300 other craft, all less than 12m operate on a part time or casual basis. This report has been produced from a scanned original and may therefore contain some formatting and other inaccuracies. In cases where this affects the technical content, a paper copy of the original report can still be obtained from Seafish.

October 1992Download PDF